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The Raspberry PI Rotary Phone Conversion

Here we ave an old rotary phone that was converted into a raspberry (py)thon ITO device. The handset has been conveted to USB for the speacker and microphone. The rotary dial has been connected to an Arduino which passes commands into the Raspberry Pi. A dialtone is generated for Off The Hook conditions. Dialing the rotary generates voice prompts back to the user. Home automatioin control is the logical next step for this IOT phone.

 

So many projects, so little time.

 

 

 

The Raspberry PI Rotary Phone Conversion

Here we ave an old rotary phone that was converted into a raspberry (py)thon ITO device. The handset has been conveted to USB for the speacker and microphone. The rotary dial has been connected to an Arduino which passes commands into the Raspberry Pi. A dialtone is generated for Off The Hook conditions. Dialing the rotary generates voice prompts back to the user. Home automatioin control is the logical next step for this IOT phone.

 

So many projects, so little time.

 

 

 

The Raspberry PI Rotary Phone Conversion

Here we ave an old rotary phone that was converted into a raspberry (py)thon ITO device. The handset has been conveted to USB for the speacker and microphone. The rotary dial has been connected to an Arduino which passes commands into the Raspberry Pi. A dialtone is generated for Off The Hook conditions. Dialing the rotary generates voice prompts back to the user. Home automatioin control is the logical next step for this IOT phone.

 

So many projects, so little time.

 

 

 

The USB Handset Hack

There were 4 wires found inside the handset, 2 for the speaker and microphone respectively. Since the Rasberry doesn't have a microphone input, a USB soundcard was needed to get the microphone working.

A regular sound patch cable was cut in half, one side for a microophone splice, the other for the speaker. A bit of solder and tape were used to make jack plugs for the handset. The handset can be used on any device with sound input/mic jacks. It's surprising how well this handset works, the sound and recording quality are great.

Here's another Raspberry Pi Rotary Telephone conversion project.

The USB Handset Hack

There were 4 wires found inside the handset, 2 for the speaker and microphone respectively. Since the Rasberry doesn't have a microphone input, a USB soundcard was needed to get the microphone working.

A regular sound patch cable was cut in half, one side for a microophone splice, the other for the speaker. A bit of solder and tape were used to make jack plugs for the handset. The handset can be used on any device with sound input/mic jacks. It's surprising how well this handset works, the sound and recording quality are great.

Here's another Raspberry Pi Rotary Telephone conversion project.

The USB Handset Hack

There were 4 wires found inside the handset, 2 for the speaker and microphone respectively. Since the Rasberry doesn't have a microphone input, a USB soundcard was needed to get the microphone working.

A regular sound patch cable was cut in half, one side for a microophone splice, the other for the speaker. A bit of solder and tape were used to make jack plugs for the handset. The handset can be used on any device with sound input/mic jacks. It's surprising how well this handset works, the sound and recording quality are great.

Here's another Raspberry Pi Rotary Telephone conversion project.

An arcade switch button was hacked to capture "Off Hook" conditions. A C-clamp was literally hacked down to fit in the tight space of the phone case. The clamp holds the switch perfectly in place, capturing the mechanical lever position from the phone. The switch is wired into the Arduino which is used to pass a signal to the Raspberry Pi.

An arcade switch button was hacked to capture "Off Hook" conditions. A C-clamp was literally hacked down to fit in the tight space of the phone case. The clamp holds the switch perfectly in place, capturing the mechanical lever position from the phone. The switch is wired into the Arduino which is used to pass a signal to the Raspberry Pi.

An arcade switch button was hacked to capture "Off Hook" conditions. A C-clamp was literally hacked down to fit in the tight space of the phone case. The clamp holds the switch perfectly in place, capturing the mechanical lever position from the phone. The switch is wired into the Arduino which is used to pass a signal to the Raspberry Pi.

An I2C Real Time Clock board was added to the Raspberry Pi for keeping acurate time. A level shifter helps to manage the voltage between the Raspberry (3V) and the Arduino(5V). Mini breadboards were used to make all the wire connections between the components. Capturing the rotary dial switch required a special circuit with resitors.

Seen here are all the pieces hooked up for testing. With the parts on hand, the project took a few weekends to bring up the dial tone.

Hacking telephones is like doing a jigsaw puzzle but different.

An I2C Real Time Clock board was added to the Raspberry Pi for keeping acurate time. A level shifter helps to manage the voltage between the Raspberry (3V) and the Arduino(5V). Mini breadboards were used to make all the wire connections between the components. Capturing the rotary dial switch required a special circuit with resitors.

Seen here are all the pieces hooked up for testing. With the parts on hand, the project took a few weekends to bring up the dial tone.

Hacking telephones is like doing a jigsaw puzzle but different.

An I2C Real Time Clock board was added to the Raspberry Pi for keeping acurate time. A level shifter helps to manage the voltage between the Raspberry (3V) and the Arduino(5V). Mini breadboards were used to make all the wire connections between the components. Capturing the rotary dial switch required a special circuit with resitors.

Seen here are all the pieces hooked up for testing. With the parts on hand, the project took a few weekends to bring up the dial tone.

Hacking telephones is like doing a jigsaw puzzle but different.